Creating “ME” Space – Space and the flow of ink

 In
ANZACATA, IACAET

Creating “ME” Space – Space and the flow of ink

by ANZACATA, IACAET
 
397 people viewed this event.

Reserving time and space for self-care is important for nurturing psychosocial and spiritual well-being. However, during the COVID pandemic, we may not even have the physical space to let us enjoy the "ME" time in the past two years due to quarantine or lockdown. The situation is even worse in locations with a high population density and tiny houses, such as Hong Kong or Shanghai. Many of us feel anxious and suffocated being trapped with our family members under the same roof. This self-care session aims to create an imaginary space as an invisible container for individuals to nurture a sense of security and comfort and encourage spontaneity in expression. This workshop will use Chinese ink and calligraphy. Reserving time and space for self-care is important for nurturing psychosocial and spiritual well-being. However, during the COVID pandemic, we may not even have the physical space to let us enjoy the "ME" time in the past two years due to quarantine or lockdown. The situation is even worse in locations with a high population density and tiny houses, such as Hong Kong or Shanghai. Many of us feel anxious and suffocated being trapped with our family members under the same roof. This self-care session aims to create an imaginary space as an invisible container for individuals to nurture a sense of security and comfort and encourage spontaneity in expression. This workshop will use Chinese ink and calligraphy.

Webinar description

Reserving time and space for self-care is important for nurturing psychosocial and spiritual well-being. However, during the COVID pandemic, we may not even have the physical space to let us enjoy the “ME” time in the past two years due to quarantine or lockdown. The situation is even worse in locations with a high population density and tiny houses, such as Hong Kong or Shanghai. Many of us can feel anxious and suffocated being trapped with our family members under the same roof. This self-care session aims to create an imaginary space as an invisible container for individuals to nurture a sense of security and comfort and encourage spontaneity in expression.  

Space usually refers to the geometrical and three-dimensional area an object or a person occupies on Earth. In addition to the physical space, space also has the psychological meaning of personal boundary and flexibility and thus relates to both intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships. The availability and accessibility of the personal space become important, particularly when an individual encounters issues that threaten personal or interpersonal needs. According to the premise of the mind-body connection, the awareness of psychological space can be achieved by exploring the physical space. We hope that through freeing the space, our mind and the body can also find a place to breathe. 

The experiential process invites participants to create and explore a safe space for themselves through imagination and creativity. This “ME” space is also the place where participants can increase their range of play. We all need to create and express ourselves, just like children, who are all natural and spontaneous artists. However, when we grow up, our range of play will be limited by our judgment, norms, and perceptions etc. In this workshop, participants will be invited to ignite their imagination and creativity, as well as enjoy a moment of tranquillity in the unique space. 

This workshop will use Chinese ink and calligraphy. Chinese calligraphy is about the flow of ink on a two-dimensional area defined by the size of paper. The process of Chinese calligraphy is an external expression of the artist’s inner feelings and thoughts. The process is a mindful integration of movement, visual art, and breathing. Also, in Chinese calligraphy, space will be skillfully reserved to maintain an optimal balance between the black and the white; and, at the same time, leave room for viewers’ interpretation. The movement of the brush, together with the balance of the ink and the space, invites everyone, regardless of whether one can read Chinese characters or not, to contemplate and reflect upon the present moment.

If possible, please come prepared with ink, brush and paper for Chinese calligraphy. If you don’t have this, you can use watercolour, paintbrush and drawing paper or other materials of your choice.

Presenters

Prof. Rainbow Tin Hung Ho
Ph.D., BC-DMT, AThR, REAT, RSMT, CGP, CMA
Associate Director, Knowledge Exchange Office
Associate Dean (Postgraduate Education), Faculty of Social Sciences
Professor, Department of Social Work & Social Administration
Director, Centre on Behavioral Health
Director, Master of Expressive Arts Therapy Program
The University of Hong Kong

Prof. Rainbow Ho has been working as a researcher, therapist, teacher, and artist (dancer) for many years. She has more than 200 publications in refereed journals, scholarly books and encyclopedia, and has been the principal investigator of many research projects related to creative and expressive arts therapy, psychophysiology, mind-body medicine, complementary and alternative therapy, spirituality, and physical activity for healthy and clinical populations for all ages. In 2015, Prof. Ho received the Outstanding Achievement

Award and Research Award from the American Dance Therapy Association and the Research and Development Award from the Australia and New Zealand Arts Therapy Association in 2016. She also received the Outstanding Teaching Award (2015), Outstanding Research Output Award (2019), Knowledge Exchange Award (2020) and Outstanding Research Student Supervisor Award (2021) from the University of Hong Kong.

Joanna To
MExpArtsTh, MBA, MA, AThR, REAT, CM
Founder, Arts for Change
Board Director, ANZACATA

Joanna To, Founder of Arts of Change, is a Registered Expressive Arts Therapist, MARI®️ practitioner,  Certified Zentangle Teacher and Pastel-Nagomi Art Teacher. In her first career, she had been a Marketing and Communications professional with Fortune 500 companies such as United Parcel Services and Newell Brands. In 2013, she was determined to pursue her second career in Expressive Arts Therapy. Prior to establishing Arts for Change, she worked for the Tsz Shan Monastery and Changing Young Lives Foundation in developing Expressive Arts Therapy programs and events for youth, professionals and the general public. Joanna is passionate in integrating Chinese arts and mindfulness practices under the domain of expressive arts therapy.

 

Date And Time

Sun, Jun 19, 2022 @ 05:00 AM (EST) to
Sun, Jun 19, 2022 @ 06:00 AM (EST)
 

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Registration End Date

Sun, Jun 19, 2022
 
 
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